Flushing CSA (Week 18) Update!

NOTE: We will hold the pickups indoors (in the basement next to the loading dock)  for the remainder of the season. As the fall season is progressing, it gets dark earlier  and with our shortened pickup hours it made more sense to be indoors.  
Our Volunteers

Thank you to last week’s volunteers: Cindy, Judith F., Dionne and Larry This week’s volunteers are: Kelvin, Kate and Judy K.

Fruit shares for those who get them. No Lewis Waite delivery this week.
SAVE THE DATE!  Golden Earthworm’s CSA Harvest Festival will take place on Sunday, October 20th from 11am-3pm at the farm in Riverhead. More information will be coming soon.

And now……What’s In The Share (note items are subject to substitution) – also check the Golden Earthworm Farm website

Bel Fiore Radicchio
I’m putting this beauty first on the list because….it is so beautiful! And you can’t find this in stores no matter how hard you look. One of the *many* benefits of CSA cooking! This is a member of the chicory family, so it is a mildly bitter green that can either be paired with a cheese or gently cooked to remove its bitter flavor. I happen to love the bitter flavor and enjoy it in salads with shaved pecorino, olive oil and lemon juice.
Storage: In an airtight container/bag in the refrigerator. Uses: Raw/Cooked (if you must) When to use: Within 5 days.

Bok Choi
Storage: In an airtight container/bag in the refrigerator. Uses: Raw/Cooked When to use: Within 5 days.

Mustard Greens Mix
This wonderful, peppery mix is back for the fall! It’s best eaten raw in a salad because the leaves are so tender. (If you try to cook the baby leaves, it will become stringy.).
Storage: In an airtight container/bag in the refrigerator. Uses: Raw When to use: Within 3 days.

Red Kale
This red kale is the perfect size to cook. It’s delicious added to fall soups.
Storage: In an airtight container/bag in the refrigerator. Uses: Raw/Cooked When to use: Within 7 days.

Baby Romaine Lettuce
Wow, this is such a beautiful lettuce! Can you feel how dense the head is, even though it is small? These are extra-special, selected for you by Farmer Matt.
Storage: In an airtight container/bag in the refrigerator. Uses: Raw When to use: Within 5 days.

Batavian Lettuce
My favorite lettuce variety is back for the fall. Crunchy, yet sweet with a wonderful texture. You can’t get lettuce like this in the stores. Enjoy!
Storage: In an airtight container/bag in the refrigerator. Uses: Raw When to use: Within 5 days.

Cilantro
I’m a huge fan of cilantro, but I don’t think that many people realize how incredibly healthy it is! It can remove heavy metals from your body. Did you know that? Google it!
Storage: In an airtight container/bag in the refrigerator. Uses: Raw When to use: Within 5 days.

Butternut Winter Squash
Feeling intimidated by winter squash? Check out the cooking tips below!
Storage: In a cool, dry spot. It’s ok on the counter for up to a week. Uses: Cooked When to use: Within 7 days.

Yellow OR Red Long Peppers
Storage: In an airtight container/bag in the refrigerator. Uses: Raw/Cooked When to use: Within 5 days.

Briermere Farm Fruit Share – 1 mixed bag of Gala & Macintosh Apples

FARMHOUSE FAVORITE RECIPES

HOW TO COOK WINTER SQUASH!
There are lots of winter squash varieties, but they can be cooked the same way. After years of fumbling around with large knifes and hard squashes, I finally discovered roasting them whole (yes, whole!) with just a few knife slits to release steam. It works like a charm. The traditional method (below) is still my favorite way to cook smaller squash when I’m serving them sliced on a plate.
The traditional method (video!)The “no-cut” cook it whole method!

Radicchio Salad with Lemon & PecorinoTuscan White Bean & Kale Soup – Our family favorite!
Mustard Greens Salad Recipe10 Minute Garlic Bok Choi
And…from your farmers at Golden Earthworm – Matt, Maggie, Kelly & Crew

As we harvest our fall crops and the fields are left empty, we start to turn in what’s left of the plants and prepare the soil in anticipation of planting cover crops.  These cover crops will germinate in the next few weeks and grow through November.  At that time, there will be enough growth to protect the soil during the winter.  The roots of the cover crop hold the soil intact to prevent erosion from wind, rain and snow.  And then in the spring, the plants which have already gotten a head start, will continue growing until we turn them in to plant again for next season. 

This cycle of planting cover crops is essential to building and enriching our soil.  Our healthy, beautiful vegetables are a direct result of healthy plants which grow in healthy soil.  Just like human health…it’s all about the terrain!  It takes years, (decades, really), to grow soil that is full of healthy microbial activity, balanced nutrients and can support the plants that we grow to feed us.  So while we put a tremendous amount of energy into growing a tomato plant, for example, we put in just as much energy into our cover crops, composting and careful micro-nutrient application and balancing.  This goes well beyond growing organically…it is growing with full-cycle health sustainability in mind. 
And it tastes better too!

Have a great week, friends!
XO Maggie for Farmer Matt, Kelly & the Crew

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